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Preschool-Early Childhood Assessment FAQ's

When should I request an assessment?

What do I do if my child is under the age of 3?

How do I request an assessment?

What happens after I request an assessment?

How long does the assessment process take?

What should I bring to the assessment?

What if I need to cancel or move an assessment?

What happens after the assessment is completed?

Who is part of the Individualized Education Program Team?

How is eligibility for special education determined? Who is eligible for services?

What are my rights as a parent of student on an IEP?


When should I request an assessment? It is never too early to start asking questions about your child’s developmental progress. Parents have the right to request an evaluation through their local school district at any time after the child has turned 3. Before submitting a request for assessment the following questions should be considered:

  • Has the child’s hearing and vision been checked in the last six months?
  • Has the child’s primary care physician noticed delays in development? (e.g., fine or gross motor delays, speech delays, cognitive delays)
  • Has the child’s caregivers (e.g. preschool teacher/day care provider) reported any problems in comparison to other children?
  • Has the child had any access to early intervention? (e.g., Preschool, Inland Regional Center, or services through private insurance)

If you have additional questions or concerns about your child’s development please contact our preschool speech and language pathologist or school psychologist for assistance. You may also request a free developmental screening with the Ages and Stages Questionnaires. For parents receiving services through the Inland Regional Center the district will assess your child prior to their 3rd birthday.


What if my child is under the age of 3? If your child is between the ages of birth and three years-old, and has a suspected developmental delay, he or she may be eligible for services through the Inland Regional Center or other county program. Parents may want to request an assessment through private insurance.


How do I request an assessment? Parents or guardians may request an assessment by submitting a written letter requesting an assessment in all areas of suspected disability, to the Beaumont Unified School District’s special education department.


What happens after I request an assessment? Upon receiving a request for assessment in writing the district has 15 days to respond.

  • By the end of the fifteen days you should expect an assessment plan and referral packet or a prior written notice indicating why an assessment is not being granted
  • The referral packet includes proposed dates, times, and location for the assessment and forms to complete
  • Within 15 days of receiving the assessment plan parents should sign and return it to the special education department

How long does the assessment process take? Upon receiving the signed assessment plan the district has 60 days to complete the assessment and schedule an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting to discuss the findings of the assessment and determine eligibility and services.

  • Typically, the Early Childhood Assessment Team will schedule two appointments to observe and assess the child followed by a third meeting to discuss the IEP
  • Evaluation sessions are often 30 minutes to 1 ½ hours
  • Initial Individualized Education Program meetings can range from 1 ½ to 2 hours

What should I bring to the assessment? Please bring your completed intake packet to avoid unnecessary rescheduling. A light snack and preferred toy or game may also help keep your child focused and on task.  Please refer to this checklist for things to bring:

  • Intake documents (Developmental history, enrollment form, reason for referral checklist, assessment plan, notice of meeting, and any other supporting documents that you would like the team to review)
  • Snack  (e.g. Goldfish, raisins, fruit snacks, pretzels)
  • Preferred toy, game, or iPad app (something that can be used as a reward or to help entertain siblings)

What if I need to cancel or move an appointment? Please contact Jennifer Reek, the Early Childhood Assessment Team (ECAT) clerk, if you need to move or cancel an assessment or IEP meeting.


What happens after the assessment is completed? Upon completion of the child’s assessment an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting will be held. During the meeting the team will discuss the child’s evaluation and present levels of performance (strengths and weaknesses) to determine needs relevant to educational progress.

  • If needs are determined, the team will develop goals and discuss supports and services to help the child.
  • Parents will receive a copy of the IEP document free of charge

Who is part of the Individualized Education Program Team? The IEP team consists of parents, specialists, teachers, and school administrators. Parents are encouraged to invite caregivers or other family members that could provide input regarding the child.


How is eligibility for special education determined? Who is eligible for services? Eligibility for special education services is determined by the IEP team after all assessment data has been reviewed and discussed. In order to qualify for special education services the child must meet federal and state eligibility criteria for one or more of the following categories:

  • Intellectual Disabilities
  • Speech or Language Impairment
  • Visual Impairment
  • Emotional Disturbance
  • Orthopedic Impairment
  • Other Health Impairment
  • Specific Learning Disability
  • Deafness
  • Hard of Hearing
  • Deaf-Blindness
  • Multiple Disabilities
  • Autism
  • Traumatic Brain Injury

What are my rights as a parent of student on an IEP? Please refer to the policies and procedures document listed on the special education homepage for detailed information.